2 characters. Flexible casting. 3 pages in length. Approximately 5 minutes running time. A short play for children about disorganization written by Phyllis J. Perry.

Lost and Found is a cute short play for two children. Visitor asks Chris if he would like to come out to play. Unfortunately, Chris has homework to redo and has lost his permission slip for the class field trip. As Visitor helps Chris search for it, they stumble upon some great finds along the way! In the end, Chris learns that he may be more organized than he thought! This play is also included in Plays For You And A Friend Or Two, a compilation of twelve short plays, each with 2 or 3 characters, and simple staging.

Phyllis J. Perry lives in Boulder, Colorado. She is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, holds a Masters Degree from San Francisco State, and a doctorate from the University of Colorado, Boulder. She has been active in three community theaters. Phyllis is a retired teacher who writes for children and adults. She writes fiction and nonfiction books, poetry and plays. A list of her 92 books can be found on her web site, www.phyllisjperry.com.

Excerpt from the play:

CAST OF CHARACTERS

THE PLAYERS:
Two children, Visitor and Chris.

THE SETTING:
At the front door of Chris’s home.

PROPS:
A backpack filled with books, a crumpled math paper, a jacket, a locket, a pair of jeans, a dollar bill, and a permission slip,

AT RISE: As the scene opens, Visitor is knocking at the door of Chris’s house. Chris comes and opens the door.

VISITOR
Hi, Chris. Can you play?

CHRIS
No, I can’t play right now. I have math homework to do. But first, I’ve lost something important and I have to find it. Want to help me look for it?

VISITOR
Sure. What did you lose? (Comes inside and closes the door.)

CHRIS
I lost that permission slip from school that we were supposed to bring home, get our mothers to sign, and return to school. It lets us go on the class field trip. I forgot to bring it today. Tomorrow is the trip. If I don’t find it and take it back, I won’t be able to go.

VISITOR
Don’t look so worried. We can find it. It’s probably still in your backpack. Where’s your pack?

CHRIS
It’s in my bedroom. (The two move into the bedroom. Chris picks up her backpack.) I just looked all through it, and I couldn’t find the note.

VISITOR
Let’s look again. Maybe it’s there and you just didn’t see it. You know what they say, two sets of eyes are better than one.

(The two begin to take everything out of the pack. They search all the pockets, and they flip through the pages of each of the books that is inside. )

CHRIS
Look! (She holds up a crumpled piece of paper.) It’s my math homework. I couldn’t find it this morning, so I was going to have to do it all over again tonight. Now I don’t have homework to do!

VISITOR
Great. Now if we can find your permission slip, you can play. Let’s tuck that paper right inside the front cover of your math books you’ll know where it is.

CHRIS
I’m glad to find my math paper. But the permission form just isn’t here.

VISITOR
Maybe it’s in the pocket of your coat or your jeans. Can you remember what you wore to school last Friday?

Why Subscribe?

kk-question box coloredInside Drama Notebook, you will find a huge collection of well-organized lesson plans, scripts for kids, drama activities, 50 drama games on video and more! Membership is only $9.95 a month. Join today and dramatically reduce your planning time while delivering fresh, innovative drama lessons to your students!

If you are new to teaching drama, this site will be a Godsend!

You will immediately feel confident about teaching drama like an expert. The site guides you step-by-step and provides you with materials that you can use right away with your students.

If you have been teaching for years, Drama Notebook will inspire you with a fresh new approach and innovative ideas!

The site is packed with original, innovative lessons and activities that you will not find anywhere else—and new materials are added monthly.