Approximately 8 minutes long. 9 characters. Comic re-telling of the classic Robert Frost poem.

“Stopping by The Woods on a Snowy Evening” is a well-known Robert Frost poem. Published in 1923 it quickly became a poem to keep in memory and many people know the words by heart. This short play can be performed along with other short plays to create a fantastic holiday showcase!

In this hilarious re-telling, the playwright adds in extra characters including robbers and a talking horse that steals the show!

Excerpt from the play:


CHARACTERS (IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE):

Robert Frost
Young Robert
Horse
Old Man
Robber 1
Robber 2
Robber 3
Mother
Child

The stage is a wintery scene. Some trees and bushes are scattered here and there. Maybe a house or two in the distance. ROBERT FROST narrates the play, only speaking text from the original poem. YOUNG ROBERT enters with the HORSE, who is wearing a backpack.

YOUNG ROBERT
C’mon. It’s a beautiful night. Finally starting to snow.

ROBERT FROST
Whose woods these are I think I know.

(The OLD MAN enters, carrying a pitchfork, peering around. He does not yet see YOUNG ROBERT or the HORSE.)

ROBERT FROST
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

OLD MAN
Hey! I see you stopping there! You’re trespassing on my property!

YOUNG ROBERT
(to the HORSE, in a stage whisper) I was sure he wouldn’t see us stopping here, I swear. (to the OLD MAN) Uh, yes, so sorry. What’s your name? Mister…?

OLD MAN
Mister none of your business, that’s what. (to the audience) Kids these days…

YOUNG ROBERT
Your woods are quite lovely, sir, and especially in the snow. I couldn’t miss the chance to be all alone on such a scenic night.

HORSE
All alone?! What do you mean, all alone? I’m standing right here!

OLD MAN
(gruffly) Don’t try to sweet-talk your way out of this one, boy. ( a beat, then, happily: ) But thank you, that’s very kind. I put a lot of work into maintaining these grounds, and no one ever appreciates it.

HORSE
I’m appreciating it a lot less every second I’m forced to stand out here in the cold.

YOUNG ROBERT
So, would you mind it if my trusty companion and I stood out here for another hour or two, taking in the beauty of this cold winter night?

(The HORSE throws their hands up into the air, frustrated. YOUNG ROBERT flashes a cheeky grin at the OLD MAN, pleading with him to let them stay. The OLD MAN considers this for a second.)

OLD MAN
Let me think… (short pause) No. Get off my land or I’m calling the cops.

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