Ten fun ways to introduce the concept of subtext! 7 pages. Ages 10 and up.

Actors must make decisions about what the playwright means and then try to communicate that meaning to an audience. The subtext of the lines depends on the situation and how the character views the situation.

For example, an actor’s line might be “It’s so nice to see you.”  The subtext, however, could be, “I really wish you weren’t here.”

It could also be “I’m madly in love with you” or “I’m so sorry I ran over your dog.”

Here are ten games designed to help your students fully understand the concept of subtext and its importance in their approach to scripted work.

Includes three warm-ups and seven activities!

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