25 improvisational situations that prompt students to develop their own character’s motivation for wanting a specific thing.

All actors must learn about character motivations and how important the character’s desires are to creating believable characters. Here are 25 improvisational situations that prompt students to develop their own character’s motivation for wanting a specific thing. Students read the prompt and come up with their own backstory about why their character is trying to obtain a specific thing.

For example:

Two students could receive this prompt: Two friends are at an amusement park. One really wants to ride the scariest ride and the other one wants to ride the merry-go-round.

Students come up with their own back-story, such as: The person who wants to ride the scariest ride may have parents who usually forbid him to go on it, but since the parents aren’t there, he has his chance! But the other person may have an extreme fear of wild rides, to the point where she usually throws up.

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